Free Bali Real Estate Seminars - Laws for Foreigners and How to Earn 10 % to 20 % per YR.


Whether you are a buyer, seller, broker, agent, investor, lessor or renter you can benefit from attending one of our two free Real Estate Seminars in Bali and Jakarta next month.


At these seminars PT. B.A.L.I’s Canadian President, Lawrence, a 22 yr. Bali resident, President of 14 yr. old company with 135 staff, married to Azizah, a fully Licenced Notaris will review the most recent real estate laws for Indonesians and Foreigners in detail.

Then they will also provide a full colour audio, visual presentation with many professional charts on the Past, Present, and Future of Bali Real Estate.

Free Seminar Schedules:


(1) Location: Jakarta, Indonesia, Le Meridien Hotel.

Dates & Times:

1. Thursday - Nov. 1st. 6:30 PM - 7:45 PM

2. Saturday - Nov. 3rd. 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

Location: Jl. Jend. Sudirman No.Kav. , Kota Jakarta Pusat, Daerah Khusus Ibukota Jakarta 10220 Telepon:(021) 2513131

Limited Seating & Free Parking:

Seating is very limited for these free seminars so please avoid disappointment and make reservations A.S.A.P. Click Here For a Reservation Or Email: seminarsptbali@gmail.com or Tel: Office: 62-361- 284069 For Bahasa English 62-8123814014 – Bahasa Indonesia or 62-8123632177


( 2) Location: Sanur, Bali,Emerald Villas,



Dates & Times:

1. Thursday - Nov. 8th. 6:30 PM - 7:45 PM


2. Saturday - Nov. 10th. 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

Location: Bali, Emerald Villas, Jl. Karangsari, # 5, Sanur, Bali, Indonesia.

Limited Seating & Free Parking:

Seating is very limited for these free seminars so please avoid disappointment and make reservations A.S.A.P. Click Here For a Reservation Or Email: seminarsptbali@gmail.com or Tel: Office: 62-361- 284069 For Bahasa English 62-8123814014 – Bahasa Indonesia or 62-8123632177

    Seminar Topics:

    At these seminars you will learn about:

    • The Past, Present and Future of Bali, Indonesia, Asian and Australian real estate.
    • Why a recent official clarification of foreign ownership laws allows foreigners to totally control Indonesian properties for up to 80 years without leases?
    • How to avoid legal problems and make sure a property is safe.
    • How to avoid complicated real estate laws affecting Indonesians married to foreigners.
    • Why this is the second best time to buy this century.
    • Where are the best locations to buy for maximum profits?
    • What type of properties will offer the best investment potential of *10% to 20 % per year?
    • Discover how you can sell your property fast for the highest prices and lowest commissions on a brand new web site designed after the largest most successful real estate site in America with high tech search features.
    • An opportunity for a free listing on B.A.R.E. First Class Beachfront property at almost 50% discount.
    • A Quality 5,000 m2 Bali Hotel with 12 bungalows, 3 pools and Restaurant for only $588,000.
    • Low cost properties with Luxury Villas starting as low as $158,000 for a three bedroom 650 m² 3 bedroom, 4 bath with private 9 mtr. Pool.
    • Ridiculously low priced ocean view building lots starting as low as $25,000 for 500 m².
    • Brand new Bali Luxury Retirement Villas starting at $208.00 per mth.

      Limited Seating & Free Parking:

      Seating is very limited for these free seminars so please avoid disappointment and make reservations A.S.A.P.

      For Jakarta Seminars Sign up Here :Click Here For a Reservation

      For Bali Seminars Sign up Here :Click Here for Reservation

      Or Email: seminarsptbali@gmail.com or Tel: Office: 62-361- 284069 For Bahasa English 62-8123814014 – Bahasa Indonesia or 62-8123632177

      Friday, 6 October 2017

      Ubud writers festival to bring big names to Bali as Mount Agung rumbles

      The show goes on: Ubud writers festival to bring big names to Bali as Mount Agung rumbles.

      The festival could coincide with the most destructive volcano in decades but organisers have opted to keep calm and carry on.

       
      Ubud writers festival was launched in 2002, to encourage visitors back to the region following the Bali bombings. Photograph: Greg Saunders



      Brigid Delaney

      Friday 6 October 2017 04.35 BSTLast modified on Friday 6 October 2017 07.18 BST


      As Mount Agung started rumbling in Bali last month, Janet DeNeefe, the director of Ubud writers festival, convened a series of crisis meetings.

      About 160 writers from Indonesia and around the world, including Ian Rankin, Tim Flannery, Jane Harper and Jung Chang, had been booked to gather in Ubud from 25 October for the 14th iteration of the festival – and a decision had to be made about whether to postpone it.

      “When the volcano became active, we went into red alert,” DeNeefe told Guardian Australia. “We had meeting upon meeting to work out what to do. We had a three-structure plan from cutting back on the festival to postponing ... so examining every option. It was very stressful.

      “This is the guy that runs the show,” DeNeefe said of the volcano. “It’s not just any old volcano. Bali just can’t help but feel cosmic.”

      The eruption is feared to be the worst in Bali in decades and it’s fair to say a destabilised writers festival is among the least of the locals’ concerns: an estimated 140,000 people in surrounding areas have been evacuated and moved into makeshift shelters and formerly bustling travel hotspots have been left virtually empty. In Australia, holiday makers put plans on hold or cancelled their trips, fearing not so much the eruption but transport chaos; airlines would be unable to fly should there be ash clouds in the air and huge consequences loomed over the island’s tourism-centric economy.
      FacebookTwitterPinterest A Balinese farmer carried on with her work as Mount Agung hotted up in the background last month. Photograph: Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images

      But now, weeks after the original rumblings, things are relatively less volatile at Mount Agung and the team at the writers festival has decided to carry on.
      The Ubud writers festival was born from tragedy. In 2002, after the Bali bombings, DeNeefe started the festival to encourage visitors back to the region. It is now regarded as one of the best writers’ festivals in the world, highlighting and promoting Indonesian authors and attracting some of the biggest names in the international literary scene.

      Writers speaking this year also include Simon Armitage, Simon Winchester, this year’s Miles Franklin winner, Josephine Wilson, the French-Indonesian animator Pierre Coffin and the Man Booker Prize finalist Madeleine Thien. The keynote will be delivered by Malaysian activist Marina Mahathir: a former UN person of the year, a leader at the Malaysian Aids Foundation and an expert on minority rights in Malaysia.

      And DeNeefe is no stranger to planning it under extraordinary pressure. While festival directors in Australia may face a headache when a foreign guest pulls out, DeNeefe has had to negotiate government censorship: the festival cancelled three sessions about the 1965 mass killings in Indonesia and their aftermath, as well as a screening of Joshua Oppenheimer’s critically acclaimed documentary The Look of Silence, and a photography exhibition, The Act of Living.

      That same year, an ash cloud lingered for weeks, leaving many stranded in Bali, and this year the festival could coincide with the most destructive volcano in decades.

      Ubud won’t be directly affected by the volcano and none of the writers has panicked or threatened to pull out, DeNeefe says. “The Balinese are kind of chilled, like, ‘Ehh – this could take months’,” she says. “But there’s lots of frantic expats out there.”

      • The Guardian is principal media partner of Ubud Writers and Readers Festival, taking place 25-29 October. Brigid Delaney is visiting as a guest of the festival.

      Since you’re here …

      … we have a small favour to ask. More people are reading the Guardian than ever but advertising revenues across the media are falling fast. And unlike many news organisations, we haven’t put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as open as we can. So you can see why we need to ask for your help. The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism takes a lot of time, money and hard work to produce. But we do it because we believe our perspective matters – because it might well be your perspective, too.

      I appreciate there not being a paywall: it is more democratic for the media to be available for all and not a commodity to be purchased by a few. I’m happy to make a contribution so others with less means still have access to information.Thomasine F-R.

      If everyone who reads our reporting, who likes it, helps to support it, our future would be much more secure.
      Become a supporter
      Make a contribution

      No comments:

      Post a Comment